newsweek:

Our latest cover story: Death on the Farm. 
American farmers are a dying breed, in part because they’re killing themselves at a shocking rate.

newsweek:

Our latest cover story: Death on the Farm

American farmers are a dying breed, in part because they’re killing themselves at a shocking rate.

(via environmentalillnessnetwork)

Years ago the philosopher Immanuel Kant noted that ‘What man must do, he can do.’ But the opposite is not true. A rigorous analysis of the full costs and benefits of wired and wireless infotech is long overdue.

environmentalillnessnetwork:

In 2011, The Michael J. Fox Foundation announced that exposure to common solvents (particularly TCE) had been linked to an increased risk for developing Parkinson’s disease:

The researchers were probing for situations that would have exposed individuals to the solvents perchloroethylene (PERC), carbon tetrachloride (CCI4) — both commonly used dry cleaning agents — and TCE.  TCE was banned by the Food and Drug Administration in 1977. It once was used in dry-cleaning solutions, adhesives, paints, carpet cleaners, as a metal degreaser and as an anesthetic, skin disinfectant, and coffee decaffeinating agent, among other uses. TCE is also the most common organic contaminant in groundwater, and is found in up to 30% of drinking water supplies across the United States.

environmentalillnessnetwork:

In 2011, The Michael J. Fox Foundation announced that exposure to common solvents (particularly TCE) had been linked to an increased risk for developing Parkinson’s disease:

The researchers were probing for situations that would have exposed individuals to the solvents perchloroethylene (PERC), carbon tetrachloride (CCI4) — both commonly used dry cleaning agents — and TCE.  TCE was banned by the Food and Drug Administration in 1977. It once was used in dry-cleaning solutions, adhesives, paints, carpet cleaners, as a metal degreaser and as an anesthetic, skin disinfectant, and coffee decaffeinating agent, among other uses. TCE is also the most common organic contaminant in groundwater, and is found in up to 30% of drinking water supplies across the United States.

Mayor of London Low Carbon Entrepreneur Update

With all applications in, we wanted to make sure you heard what last year’s winners have been up to so asked Will and Rachel to tell us all about it.

"We submitted Reseed after writing the idea on a back of a receipt from our campus cafe. Paper just didn’t make sense in our digital world, and we soon discovered the extent of the negative impact on the environment that receipts had, and the positive impact of planting trees. We want to go further than simply getting rid of receipts; we want to remediate the damage already inflicted, by changing consumers’ attitudes towards charitable giving and the concept of environmental sustainability. We want to put green in everyone’s pocket.

The Low Carbon Prize application process was incredible. We won’t ever forget the feeling (and nerves) of pitching to a Dame, a Dragon and an MP, amongst a panel of illustrious judges.

After the excitement of the announcement, awards ceremony, photo calls and interviews, we had a chance to think about the best way to achieve our goal. We are currently engaging with partners including financial technology companies, high street retailers and charities. At a higher level, we are preparing our proposal for a receipt tax, similar to the plastic bag tax introduced only a few years ago.

Though your ideas may change and evolve, this is a great competition to develop, network, and the only seed required is a quick application.

Will was recently appointed as one of the 2014 London Leaders by the London Sustainable Development Commission, and Reseed has been featured in the Huffington Post, Parade magazine and is also supported by the Clinton Global Initiative. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/will-hines/going-paperless-the-hidde_b_3008587.html.

You can find out more about Reseed on their Twitter (@ReseedOrg) and their website http://reseed.org, launching soon.”

Make sure you follow @LDN_Environment to get future alerts on this Low Carbon prize.

Here’s your pyramid scheme for a happier, healthier world. Illustration courtesy Sarah Lazarovic.

Here’s your pyramid scheme for a happier, healthier world.

Illustration courtesy Sarah Lazarovic.

Free HEA Workshop: Enriching the Curriculum with Sustainability and Environmental Responsibility

Dear All,

Canterbury Christ Church University will be holding a HEA thematic workshop on the Friday 16th May at Blake Hall College in London.

This workshop focuses on an innovative approach to enriching curriculum with sustainability and environmental responsibility, known as the ‘Futures Initiative’.  Delegates will be introduced to some of the different initiatives which have been developed across the University, the philosophy behind them and some of the challenges which have emerged in their implementation. These examples will provide delegates with the chance to reflect on how a bottom-up or grass-roots approach to embedding sustainability might work within their own institutions.

For more details and to book please visit: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/events/detail/2014/Seminars/Themes/GEN969_CCC

Dr Peter Rands

Director of Sustainability Development

Canterbury Christ Church University

Petition: Gove and Solar Schools

Over the past four days, more than 6,000 people have told the Education Secretary for England, Michael Gove that solar energy for schools is common sense.

And yesterday, he publically committed to speaking to the Chancellor about making it easier for schools to go solar.

This is a great step forward. Michael Gove has the power to change the rules so that schools can get funding to install solar panels quickly and easily.  But we want to make sure he really understands just how popular solar energy for schools is.

Please sign our petition asking Michael Gove to make it easy for schools to go solar

Schools shouldn’t have to waste money on expensive energy bills. Solar panels could save the average school up to £8,000 a year. This means more money to spend on the things that make a difference to children - books, supplies and activities.

Starting with schools – let’s get clean energy into every town and every neighbourhood

Great to see this campaign! How brilliant if we could get all our schools to take up solar power. What a difference it would make. -Shana

Welcome to my blog as I optimistically share news, current debates, events and more on the topic of sustainable living with students and staff at the Institute of Education, London. Drawing on global debates and news and London based events, the blog will also communicate the IOESU and IOE initiatives I co-ordinate across the year. These initiatives can be undertaken by schools, universities, academics and organisations. Just add enthusiasm and creativity. These initiatives will seek to link in with Camden Council’s Green Team and the local community where possible to enable and encourage community engagement.

Suggestions, collaborations and volunteers are most welcome. IOE staff and students are invited to get in touch and become a part of the IOE sustainability team. Contact Shana Tufail s.tufail@ioe.ac.uk

My aim is to challenge the way we consume, encourage a sharing economy and push forth a new paradigm shift towards a more sustainable way of living.

The views expressed are my own to encourage debate and engagement.